The Grandmaster Experiment

ImageThe world’s first female grandmaster was ready to deliver her regular Thursday-night lecture. Susan Polgar was perfumed, coiffed, made-up and dressed in a sleek black pantsuit, an elegant contrast to the boys and young men hunched over their boards in her Queens, New York, chess club. “I have a special treat,” Susan, 36, announced in her gentle Hungarian accent. “Tonight, everyone will get to play me.” Blitz chess it was—each opponent received five minutes on his clock to Susan’s one. She first sat across from a young Serbian man. The two began slamming pieces and punching down their side of the clock, creating a percussive sound track to their lightning-fast moves. Susan beat him with a good 30 seconds to spare. He shook his head and avoided her eyes. A retired bartender and a 14-year-old boy succumbed almost as quickly. A reluctant 9-year-old suffering from an allergy attack was then coaxed to step up to the challenge. “Don’t worry about your eyes—everybody loses to her anyway,” his mom said helpfully. The boy’s minutes slipped away to inevitable loss. “Once you have a winning position,” Susan said, “play with your hands, not your head. Trust your intuition.” Continue reading

“Don’t Eat Fortune’s Cookie”

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Thank you. President Tilghman. Trustees and Friends. Parents of the Class of 2012. Above all, Members of the Princeton Class of 2012. Give yourself a round of applause. The next time you look around a church and see everyone dressed in black it’ll be awkward to cheer. Enjoy the moment.

Thirty years ago I sat where you sat. I must have listened to some older person share his life experience. But I don’t remember a word of it. I can’t even tell you who spoke. What I do remember, vividly, is graduation. I’m told you’re meant to be excited, perhaps even relieved, and maybe all of you are. I wasn’t. I was totally outraged. Here I’d gone and given them four of the best years of my life and this is how they thanked me for it. By kicking me out.  Continue reading

Two Hundred Years of Surgery

ImageSurgery is a profession defined by its authority to cure by means of bodily invasion. The brutality and risks of opening a living person’s body have long been apparent, the benefits only slowly and haltingly worked out. Nonetheless, over the past two centuries, surgery has become radically more effective, and its violence substantially reduced — changes that have proved central to the development of mankind’s abilities to heal the sick. Continue reading

Let`s get a little louder

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A month ago, I attended a design/front end development conference. I was so excited to attend. My employer even sponsored the conference to show their support.

I saw that a fellow Django colleague was speaking at the conference. Having attended DjangoCon and PyCon, where I knew lots of the attendees, this would be a conference in which I knew no one. It was cool to see someone from my community attending and I decided to connect with him. We caught up at the conference and talked in between sessions. Continue reading